Marist Mission

Roselle Catholic embraces the Marist mission.  That mission has its origins in the work of St. Marcellin Champagnat, a priest in rural France, who, in 1817, founded a band of teaching "brothers," now known as the Marist Brothers.  St. Marcellin urged  those first of his followers "to make Jesus known and loved" by all children, but especially those children most ignored by the society around them.  His "little brothers" did so by establishing schools whereby those children could be made more aware both of the workings of their world and God's generosity in bringing that world about.
 
That was almost two hundred years ago.  The Marist Brothers continue St. Marcellin's work to this day, numbering about five thousand Brothers spread across the globe.  They have been active in the United States for the past one hundred twenty-five years, from Massachusetts to Texas, via Chicago.  They have been particularly active in the New York metropolitan area, establishing some schools of their own and co-operating with local dioceses in establishing others.
 
In 1959, the Archdiocese of Newark established Roselle Catholic High School and asked the Marist Brothers to help. Since the school's founding, dozens of Brothers have worked here, in every imaginable capacity, and with incredible dedication. 
 
And so Roselle Catholic is a school in the Marist tradition.  We are formally affiliated with the Brothers, some of whom have served, and others continue to serve, on our School Board. Brothers continue to live and  work here.  Our administrators belong to the Marist Schools Leadership Institute, whereby they exchange best practices with Marist educators from around the country.   Our faculty and students regularly use the Brothers' retreat facility, a beautiful, restful spot in Esopus, New York, on the shores of the Hudson River.  But most importantly, the spirt of St. Marcellin continues to inform daily life around  here;  in his words, we "lead youth to Jesus," by "first loving them, and loving them equally."